Wellness program ideas

17 Jul

Do you have an employee wellness program?

Wellness programs can be a great workplace benefit. Not only are these programs a great incentive to work for a company, but also they can help keep your workers healthier, happier and more productive as a result. All is all, a wellness program is also one of the greatest employee engagement ideas for your staff. A survey from Society of Human Resources Managers found 76 percent of organizations have some sort of wellness program. Moreover, participation between 2012 to 2014 increased year over year. Clearly wellness is more popular than ever! That being said, there are many different types of wellness programs you can implement. How do you start? Here are some ideas:

Provide healthy food
One of the easiest health programs is to make sure there are nutritious snacks on hand. This could mean fruit and vegetables or even nutrition bars and yogurt. While employees frequently bring in sugary treats to share, staff have to rely on themselves to pack healthy lunches, and with an on-the-go lifestyle, it's not always easy to do. Provide easy access to healthy food, and employees will thank you.

Promote gym memberships
Even if you don't have a gym on premises, you can work out a deal with a local fitness center or reimburse employees for a portion of the membership cost, BenefitsPro pointed out. Picking a gym and sticking with a workout regimen can be difficult for many people. However, if co-workers make a plan to hit the gym after work, even the most reluctant athlete will be more likely to attend.

Encourage exercise in other ways
Invite staff to participate in regular physical activity, like biking or even running to work. To make it easier on those who choose to participate, install some showers in the office, U.S. News and World Report suggested. This way, staff could also use their lunch breaks to make a quick trip to the gym. You might be surprised how many people would start biking to work once they can clean up afterward.

Have work from home options
When sick employees come into work, the illness spreads to their colleagues. While one person may feel comfortable powering through a bad cold with the help of pseudoephedrine, the same bug might put co-workers down for the count. If ill staff members want to pass on sick day coverage, encourage them to work from home so their co-workers aren't faced with the same issue.

Employees increasingly look for a balance between work and life. Making it easier to fit in a workout can also ease this burden.

Tips for an employee rewards program

17 Jul

How do you reward employees for a job well done?

Retention and turnover are some of the biggest issues human resources managers deal with on a day-to-day basis. Consequently, HR departments are constantly looking for good employee engagement ideas. These problems are not easy to solve, but providing employee recognition programs is one way to help employees realize their work is valued. What makes a good employee recognition program?

Give staff rewards they want
You may think a gift card to an area restaurant is an appropriate gift, but do your employees agree? Maybe they would rather have an appreciation event with catered food or even extra time off. Rewards programs work best when the incentives are actually desirable. Consider polling your employees to find out what kinds of rewards would inspire them to participate in the program.

Provide up-front rewards
It's a good idea to reward employees immediately for a job well done, according to Incentive Magazine. It may be tempting to wait until the end of the quarter or year for a big ceremony, but it's better to reward employees along the way. This helps to motivate them consistently and keeps morale high. It's OK to have a final reward dinner, but provide smaller incentives at intervals along the way.

Make sure the rules are fair
There are a number of things to consider when setting up a rewards program. You want to make sure employees can actually obtain rewards while still having to work hard to achieve their goals. In addition, make sure every department is able to obtain rewards. Frequently review the past winners to be sure that you are equally representing all departments and not focusing on a small few.

Tie rewards to business values
Make sure your reasoning for giving out awards is strategic, as these programs tend to be more successful. A study from Society of Human Resources Management found that companies who tied their recognition programs to the values of their organizations were more likely to perceive their programs as successful. However, only slightly more than one-half of organizations connected their programs with the company's values. Use your company's values as a basis for rewards. For instance, if you value teamwork, reward staff who demonstrate a willingness and ability to collaborate with others.

Rewards programs are effective ways to show employees you care. Feeling valued leads to personal growth and greater retention rates.

Maintaining poster compliance with outsourced payroll

2 Jul

Businesses outsourcing their payroll have an easier time keeping employees happy and staying compliant with regulations.

The U.S. Department of Labor requires businesses to display posters on the walls around their offices. These posters convey important information about employee rights in the workplace. Full of image- and text-based information, the DOL posters are varied, and each one is applicable to different types of businesses. An outsourced payroll vendor can inform a company which posters it must display and how to keep them updated based on current regulation changes.

What types of posters might go up at a business?
Almost any federal or state law pertaining to employment has its own poster. Here is a short list of some posters employees may find in their workplaces:

  • Job Safety and Health Protection poster
  • Equal Employment Opportunity – Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (as amended) poster
  • Fair Labor Standards Act Wage and Hour Division poster
  • Notice to All Employees Working on Federal or Federally Financed Construction Projects Wage and Hour Division poster
  • Office of Labor-Management Standards Executive Order poster

Each of these posters pertains to a very specific collection of businesses and has its own set of rules regarding where the poster can be displayed. For instance, construction companies must post one version of the Wage and Hour Division poster, while small businesses have to post another. Requirements vary depending on the industry, company size and types of employees.

Where can businesses find posters?
As HR360 pointed out, all of the federally mandated posters are available for free on the Department of Labor website. However, each state has its own unique series of guidelines companies have to follow when it comes to posters in the workplace. This is where outsourced human resources systems come in.

Outsourcing payroll improves poster compliance
It's no surprise outsourced HR is there, ready to step in and streamline processes like maintaining compliance when it comes to paychecks, benefits enrollment, tax deductions, hiring and more. But when it comes to posters physically in the workplace, these service providers are also on top of things, keeping businesses up to speed on any changes to poster guidelines or information that employees must be aware of.

For example, as of April, private employers working in the commerce sector have to display the Job Safety and Health Protection poster issued by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration in a spot where both employees and applicants can clearly see it. Should an original poster not be available, these types of companies would have to print out an 8.5-by-14-inch poster with at least 10 point font for workers to observe and read. HR is already bogged down by daily tasks, managing entire businesses and ensuring workers are meeting their potential. Monitoring updates and deadlines for posters could waste time and money if the posters don't go up in a timely manner.

Having an outsourced HR provider is especially helpful for enterprises with locations in multiple states. Since each state requires unique versions of some posters, a single department may find it difficult to keep track of all the regulatory changes or guidelines for each location.

Failure to comply could result in fines
If the DOL completes an audit of a particular business and finds the company isn't up to date on its mandatory posters, each violation could cost the business a fine or penalty fee. The company could also receive contract sanctions or have to appear in court where civil penalties would be assessed. Some violations have no consequences. 

Outsourcing payroll can not only improve businesses' compliance to specific paycheck deductions and benefits administration, but it can also enhance the daily lives of workers around the country.

Exempt employee status change on the horizon

19 Jun

Automating and outsourcing can ensure HR departments maintain accurate payroll and comply with governmental regulations.

Coming soon to a workplace near you: changes in overtime pay for employees in a variety of positions. The Obama administration plans to unveil its new regulations for employers paying workers overtime wages. These new guidelines would, among other things, include a new definition for exempt and nonexempt worker classification.

Who is exempt?
Currently, employees are exempt from being paid for working overtime, which means more than 40 hours per week, if they are executives, administrative professionals or workers in the computer, creative arts, science or learning industries, according to the Department of Labor. The position an employee holds in one of these industries determines his or her exact exemption status. In general, however, exempt employees are salaried and make no less than $455 per week, or $23,660 per year.

Nonexempt employee status covers just about every other role in the book. These workers are entitled to one-and-a-half times their regular pay rate if they work more than 40 hours in one week, according to the Fair Labor Standards Act.

What changes are on the horizon?
The Obama Administration is considering increasing the threshold for exempt workers from $23,660 to somewhere between $45,000 and $52,000, according to Politico. If the DOL raises the threshold to $42,000, The Economic Policy Institute estimates an additional 3.5 million workers will be eligible for overtime pay. Should the DOL try to account for inflation and raise the threshold to cover the same percentage of workers as were nonexempt in 1975, the threshold would have to be $69,004, subsequently covering 65 percent of salaried employees in the U.S.

How can human resources prepare for this change?
While no final figure has been reached yet, HR departments across the nation may want to prepare now for future changes. Outsourcing payroll is a positive step in the direction of compliance. Rather than entering salaries and overtime hours and then adjusting overtime wages manually, an outsourced payroll solution automates this process, freeing up HR to focus on other pressing issues. Penalties for failing to comply with any DOL or FLSA stipulations could cost businesses money and their reputations, making it more difficult to recruit and hire top industry talent.

It's imperative HR professionals ensure accuracy when it comes to both salaries and overtime pay, especially if these changes do take place and companies across the U.S. are given a fixed amount of time in which to make their own employee status adjustments. 

Tips for hiring remote workers

19 Jun

Hiring remote workers takes a few extra insights from HR.

Businesses today have the ability to hire people from around the world to contribute expertise and imagination to their operations. One of the most popular trends for employers right now is offering employees the opportunity to work remotely. To effectively hire, manage, and retain remote employees, human resources professionals need to consider the unique challenges presented by this set-up.

ConnectSolutions conducted a survey of professionals across a variety of industries and found 63 percent of remote workers had a more positive attitude. Global Workplace Analytics found remote workers to be more productive, as they weren't interrupted by meetings or visits from co-workers throughout the day. The bottom line is employers and employees enjoy remote capabilities.

How can HR develop successful remote workers?
Any opportunities for professional development presented to internal employees should be extended to remote workers as well. It also takes a keen eye to hire the right people for this job. The Daily Muse stated the key to hiring the right workers for remote offices or off-site work is face-to-face interviews and skills assessments.

Face-to-face interviews
It's imperative that applicants interested in remote positions are self-motivated and productive. Body language and tone of voice can tell an employer a lot about what a person is really like. If the candidate can't come into the headquarter office for an interview, conducting a video interview is a great idea. This allows HR to get a stronger impression of the candidate's personality, values, and goals.

Skills assessment 
Remote workers, if they are hired specifically to work off-site, likely will not receive the same training as internal and local hires. HR managers need to accurately assess new employees' skill sets prior to hiring to ensure these fresh faces will be able to not only handle the work load but improve over time. It's a good idea to hire remote workers with extensive experience and excellent references.

Invest in meaningful technology
Businesses must provide all employees with the appropriate technology to ensure collaboration between internal and remote workers. Cloud-based applications that allow different departments to access the same files and view each others' updates instantly provide the opportunity for efficient and clear collaboration. 

Businesses should also consider investing in HR management software. A robust platform keeps all workers' records, payroll, and personal information organized. This type of software can assist HR when it comes to maintaining compliance with state and federal regulations, many of which may be different for each remote worker, depending on their location. 

Going green and HR’s influence on the environment

22 May

HR professionals can have great influence over whether their companies incorporate green practices into daily routines.

Business leaders may be surprised to hear environmentally friendly practices are excellent employee engagement strategies. Business leaders may be even more surprised to learn human resources professionals can help corporations and their employees become more green. In fact, if there's one department that's well-equipped to head up such an endeavor, it's HR.

American workforce growing more environmentally conscious 
It's important to note employees today, especially millennials, enjoy working for companies invested in social and environmental causes. Switch and Shift compiled research from a variety of sources outlining the goals of millennials today. It found a 23 percent increase in volunteerism among 16- to 24-year-olds between 1989 and 2005. Of those who volunteer, 79 percent are motivated purely by passion to help others. Millennials, more so than any other generation, are faced with the task of preserving the environment for their futures, so green initiatives and matters pertaining to natural surrondings will be of greater importance to them. 

In addition, a survey conducted by the Society for Human Resources Management on HR and environmental sustainability found 49 percent of businesses with green workplace practices claimed these environmentally conscious actions helped them recruit top talent. On top of that, 40 percent believed a green work environment led to greater employee retention.

So, where does HR come into the picture?

HR and going green 
Corporations have enormous influence over decisions and opinions made on a global scale. Business leaders' actions can affect those of other companies, industries, governments and local communities. HR is the only department in a corporation that truly interacts with everyone. Executives, managers, entry-level employees, administrative assistants, mail room employees and more all spend time with HR in some capacity. Working with people at all levels is the key to building a sustainable, green office, and HR is the right team for the job.

Currently, according to the SHRM survey, 68 percent of companies already have implemented environmentally friendly procedures in their offices. These businesses found the green initiatives improved employee morale and loyalty, boosted brand recognition among consumers and yielded more efficient output.

To be effective, HR must help their businesses incorporate green guidelines into employees' daily activities; the environment must become a central focus and consideration on a fundamental level. Formal policies, used by 52 percent of those businesses surveyed, are highly recommended.

Some formal policies HR departments currently use include:

  • Going paperless - EcoSeed stated cloud platforms are excellent tools for businesses looking to go green. Rather than printing multiple copies of a single document, work teams can share items with each other via the cloud, making changes together and avoiding printing at all. In addition, all businesses should offer direct deposit for employees. This eliminates the need for envelopes or printing checks every few weeks.
  • Recycling - Companies should have blue recycling bins next to every printer in an office and under every employee desk if possible. Some businesses take this one step further and add compost bins to office kitchen areas. This decreases the amount of waste produced by the organization as a whole.
  • Offering telecommuting - One growing trend in business operations is telecommuting. SHRM reported companies like Dell, Aetna and Xerox allow certain employees to work from home. In fact, these three corporations were able to save 95,294 metric tons of greenhouse gases in 2014 simply by allowing employees to telecommute. Not only has this move improved Dell, Aetna and Xerox's employee satisfaction ratings, but it's made the hiring and retention processes easier.

One thing HR must remember is to design a reliable method for each policy and measure return on investment. SHRM found in its survey that 47 percent of companies with both green initiatives and ROI measurements saw a positive return, and 46 percent responded it was too early to tell with their current practices. None of the respondents claimed a negative ROI. 

To increase employee engagement, retention and recruitment, HR should look into spearheading environmental policies in their offices. 

E-cigarettes and HR policies

22 May

E-cigarettes may give HR professionals a reason to review current office policies.

Human resources professionals have to take the safety and well-being of all employees into account when composing business policies and procedures. Many companies provide health and wellness programs to employees or organize corporate outings that encourage physical activity and good mental health. However, with the emergence of new technologies, HR departments are finding their policies may need revamping.

What are e-cigarettes?
E-cigarettes gained popularity in the U.S. in 2007, and the devices still receive mixed reviews when it comes to risks, side effects and benefits, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The products, which are battery-operated and require no ignition, allow people to inhale aerosol versions of the addictive chemicals found in real cigarettes. The FDA reported it's unclear what amounts of nicotine and other chemicals are actually inhaled by users and how much is let out into the atmosphere.

Primarily, people began using e-cigarettes to quit smoking real tobacco. The Society for Human Resource Management reported between 2004 and 2011, industries with cigarette smokers varied, though construction, mining and accommodation accounted for 30 percent of all smoking employees in this timeframe. By 2013, about 30 percent of all smokers had tried e-cigarettes. The U.S. Center for Disease Control found between 2010 and 2013, the number of U.S. adults smoking e-cigarettes more than doubled. 

The only e-cigarettes currently officially regulated by the FDA are therapeutic e-cigarettes. The FDA Center for Tobacco Products regulates only real cigarettes, rolling tobacco and smokeless tobacco, though its goal is to soon help regulate electronic versions as well. 

Potentially harmful vapors and the office
When it comes to smoking e-cigarettes in the workplace, it gets a little tricky. Technically, electronic devices are not real cigarettes, but because side effects are unknown, it's best to establish a strict policy on whether e-cigarettes can be used indoors. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health recommended completely banning e-cigarettes in the workplace. 

"Employers have invested significant time and resources into developing effective workplace policies that help reduce the use of tobacco among employees and their families," Jerry Noyce, Health Enhancement Research Organization's president and CEO, told SHRM.

Noyce's organization contributed to publishing a paper entitled "Guidance to Employers in Integrating E-Cigarettes/Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems into Tobacco Worksite Policy" earlier this year. The report concluded businesses should consider e-cigarettes as part of the same category as tobacco products and until further review from the FDA, ban them from indoor use in offices.

However, since many smokers are using the e-cigarettes to quit their smoking habits, it's crucial employers offer electronic users their own designated smoking areas separate from traditional smokers. This is a huge step toward ensuring those employees trying to quit stay on the right path.

In maintaining compliance with the Affordable Care Act, HR departments cannot require smokers to quit. A valid choice would be to incorporate smoking cessation options into current wellness programs or practices. In addition, HR professionals should check their state regulations, as some states already ban e-cigarettes indoors.

Strategic human resources solutions to employee health issues are crucial to maintaining a healthy, productive work environment. 

Stevens v. Rite Aid: A lesson on the ADA

22 May

Human resources professionals can use employee management software to ensure ADA and EEOC guidelines are met.

Recently, a licensed pharmacist named Christopher Stevens was fired by his employer, Rite Aid. The Society for Human Resource Management reported the company claimed Stevens' refusal to perform specific duties  on the job led to his termination. However, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission found Rite Aid in violation of both the Americans with Disabilities Act and the New York State Human Rights Law. In January, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of New York awarded Stevens a total of $2.6 million.

Where did Rite Aid go wrong?
Stevens has been working as a pharmacist and pharmacy manager in upstate New York for almost 40 years. In 1977, when Stevens started his career, administering immunizations to customers was not part of the pharmacist's job description. This sat well with Stevens, as he suffers from trypanophobia, or a crippling fear of needles.

Law 360 reported Rite Aid bought Eckerd Pharmacy, where Stevens worked in Utica, New York, in 2007. As flu shots became more popular in recent years, Rite Aid made the decision to offer the immunizations at pharmacies around the country. This meant pharmacists would have to inject customers with immunizations after attending a training program to become certified to do so.

Stevens received an email with the immunization certification information in March 2011, requesting his presence at an upcoming training session. His doctor swiftly provided Rite Aid's human resource department and district managers with documents outlining the pharmacist's trypanophobia. Needles and injections caused Stevens to sweat profusely, grow anxious and experience a sharp decrease in blood pressure. In addition to the doctor's letter, SHRM noted Steven's asked for a reasonable accommodation from Rite Aid, which would have provided him an alternative work environment or task to administering immunizations.

Federal regulation compliance issues 
As outlined in the Americans with Disabilities Act, employers cannot discriminate against workers in the public accommodation sector, among others, due to disabilities. ADA and the EEOC define disabilities as both mental and physical ailments that limit fundamental actions, such as walking, talking or hearing. Disabilities can also include chronic illnesses, either currently present or in remission.

Rather than offering a reasonable accommodation, Rite Aid sent another training session notification to Stevens and asked for clarification on the contents of the doctor's note regarding trypanophobia. The doctor informed Rite Aid having Stevens administer flu shots would be a danger to both patients and the pharmacist himself.

In August 2011, the district pharmacy manager, HR manager and district manager for Rite Aid told Stevens in person he would be fired if he did not complete the training. Stevens was let go five days later.

The EEOC investigation
The EEOC took a look into the situation after Stevens filed a claim. The organization found Rite Aid had in fact discriminated against the pharmacist's disability and fired him unlawfully. The EEOC also found giving customers immunization injections wasn't a vital aspect of Stevens' position with the company, nor does the state of New York require a licensed pharmacist be able to give injections.

The jury awarded a total of $2.6 million to Stevens. Broken down, that amount is comprised of:

  • Back pay: $485,633 for work that could have been completed had Rite Aid allowed Stevens to work
  • Front pay: $1.23 million for employment discrimination
  • Emotional distress damages: $900,000 for causing mental anguish or stress

The jury did not, however, award any punitive damages in the case. According to Legal Match, this is likely due to the fact that Rite Aid broke or altered a contract, an action which does not result in punitive damages. Stevens also suffered no physical harm, which is typically when juries decide to award punitive damages.

What could Rite Aid have done differently?
No company wants a public lawsuit that concludes with a disgruntled, distressed employee and a big ADA compliance failure on record. Businesses want their employees to be happy, successful contributors to the organization. A strategic human resource management system can help large corporations like Rite Aid better handle these tricky scenarios and communicate with workers to understand their unique situations. Employers must be informed of any and all nuances as they apply to the ADA, EEOC and Department of Labor guidelines. These stipulations are hard to keep track of, and without excellent tools to help organize employees and changing job descriptions, businesses could end up paying fines on a regular basis. 

Who should HR report to?

22 May

CEOs and CFOs can both offer HR professionals insight into what the business needs.

Human resources professionals are quickly becoming more integral to the way businesses are run. While they have always been important to acquiring and building the talent that puts corporations on the map, it's becoming clearer than ever their roles should be more closely aligned with those in the C-suite. This begs the question: Should HR report to the CEO or the CFO?

Pros of pairing HR and the CEO
The Saratoga Business Journal discussed the role of HR as it applies to the CEO of a business. According to Rose Miller, an HR consultant, there is no clearer correlation between the objectives of the CEO and HR. The two are inextricably linked together in that both wish to drive the business forward. Since the CEO shapes company culture, and the HR department essentially ensures that culture is maintained throughout the office and in every new hire, it makes sense that HR would report directly to the CEO.

In addition, Inc. magazine discussed the notion that the CEO is the only individual in an organization who has direct contact with all people, teams, decisions and aspects of business operations. It figures CEOs would work with the department in the same situation. HR is active on just about every level, from hiring personnel to ensuring performance standards are up to par. Essentially, HR is a direct reflection of the CEO.

Cons of pairing HR and the CEO
However, as nearly anyone who has tried to schedule a call or meeting with a CEO knows, these executives are often spread incredibly thin across a huge variety of projects and obligations. If working with HR to convey expectations and provide solutions to company issues isn't within the CEO's schedule, it's likely these tasks will get pushed to the back burner.

Often, in an attempt to better manage HR, CEOs will outsource the department, Inc. stated. While this is sometimes beneficial, it could distance the human resources professionals from the people they are supposed to be managing, helping and providing information to on a regular basis. This type of CEO-HR relationship wouldn't be conducive to a successful business.

Pros of HR reporting to the CFO  
The potential for a CEO-HR relationship to become strained is why there are advocates for HR reporting to the CFO instead. The roles of the CFO and the HR department both have undergone serious changes in terms of responsibilities, leadership and involvement in key decision-making in the past few decades. This puts them on a similar level in terms of understanding one another.

One reason why it would make sense for HR to report to the CFO is that both entities are focused on planning now for the future - investing in resources that will help grow the business down the line. The Deloitte University Press outlined this potential relationship, elaborating on the element of driving business results. CFOs and HR both consider the long term, making decisions today they know will affect the company years down the line. These investments may be more closely aligned than people think.

As of 2010, 85 percent of a company's assets were intangible, compared to only 40 percent in 1975, according to an infographic from Deloitte. This means CFOs and HR are able to determine a business's worth with greater ease than ever before. 

In addition, as CFO magazine pointed out, financial managers can help ensure regulation compliance for HR, as there are exorbitant fees associated with failing to adhere to federal and state regulations. With finances in mind, CFOs would be able to better prioritize benefits package inspection and required financial paperwork to keep the business afloat. 

Cons of HR reporting to the CFO
Unfortunately, a financial perspective is also a reason why HR may not want to report to the CFO. Fundamentally, CFOs are financially driven, and HR is people driven. As outlined by CFO magazine, the principles used to guide strategic financial decisions for a business are not the same principles that should influence decisions about people, benefits, employee engagement and talent management. Building a strong workforce and attracting top talent in an industry requires spending, and sometimes CFOs can't see beyond the figures on the page. Yet spending funds on recruiting and employee perks could lead to the onboarding of the next CEO. 

When it comes down to it, HR professionals are concerned with office culture and taking care of each individual on the payroll. CFOs are much more concerned with the bottom line. HR leaders have a sixth sense for the type of person an organization needs; relying on a figure-driven party to determine whether this person is good or bad for a particular position may not be best. 

When in doubt, it may behoove a business to place the CEO, CFO and head of HR at the forefront of an organization to lead as a team. 

Creating a team leader-focused performance review process

22 May

Performance reviews should happen more often, and employees must be heavily involved.

Human resources professionals may want to invest in employee management software if they have not already. especially as the methods for employee performance evaluations are beginning to shift across industries. Recently, Deloitte University completely revamped its performance evaluation process based on significant data accrued from employees and managers. HR professionals should take a look to see how their current practices could benefit. Should they decide to make changes, a reliable software platform can help ease that transition. 

What needed to change?
Deloitte University realized it needed a better way to not only recognize performance, but also to clearly observe accomplishments and track employee progress. With reviews once per year, this wasn't feasible. The company now encourages team leaders to review individual performances after every project is completed in addition to meeting on a weekly basis to discuss ideas, thoughts on improvement and other work-related concerns. While working on long-term projects, employees should expect quarterly reviews. In addition, the weekly reviews are to be initiated by the employee instead of the team leader. This creates a much more dynamic discussion rather than a one-sided review. 

How can this change be implemented?
A Deloitte survey found 58 percent of executives don't believe their current performance management systems actually drive employee engagement or work to improve skills, output or productivity. Marcus Buckingham, Marcus Buckingham Co. chairman, told the Society for Human Resource Management recommended those businesses reevaluate the needs of workers and shift to focus more heavily on the team leader-employee relationship. Managers should be asking themselves what team members are capable of, how each individual is applying unique skills, if those skills are working to improve performance and what traits each team member exhibits that may contribute to their current performance. 

These questions put the leader in the driver's seat, though the review is also more heavily engaged with the employee. Employee management software can help human resources professionals and team leaders communicate on issues pertaining to performance reviews and design a system that benefits workers, and in doing so, enhances the value of the entire organization. 

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