Archive by Author

How to attract millennials to your workplace

11 Aug

millennials-at-work_2

LaDonna Lewis, product manager at Sage Payroll HCM shares how to attract millennials to your workplace.

By 2020, Millennials will make up 50 percent of the workforce as baby boomers continue to retire. In any competitive industry, Millennials aren’t going to find your company attractive if you do not have a good talent recruitment process in place.

Here are five key elements to consider when marketing your place of employment to Millennials.

•    Have a good brand Identity. Millennials are searching for employers who are known as being trusted advisors in their industry. Reputation is everything. If your company does not have good branding, Millennials will look the other way. When considering your brand image, your business must be able to facilitate knowledge about vision, values, and employer value proposition.

•    Make your recruiting process mobile friendly. Our recent global study on Millennials shows that 41 percent of this generation believe that technology will make the concept of “your desk” defunct and that, in the future, everyone will work through a mobile platform. How does this affect your workplace? Is your business ready for the boom of mobile use by 2020?

•    Have a social media presence. Whether you have a large or small workforce, it’s important to have a social media presence and an external facing career portal. Most of recruiting today is done through social media. A 2016 survey conducted by SHRM reported that 84 percent of organizations are using social media to find the right candidates. When most people think of social media, they refer directly to the marketing department. It’s essential that HR professionals also have the training and skill set of the latest social media tools to attract the right candidates. When interviewing candidates or potential business partners, the first thing I do is search their social media channels to see how they represent themselves online. If you are going to be an employer of the future, your human resources department should have the tools in place to automate.

•    Create a great environment for your employees. With the power of social media good news travels quickly, and bad news travels faster. For an organization with a limited talent pool, one bad employee experience can destroy a company. Businesses looking to attract Millennials should make sure their workplace is one where employees can have a good work-life balance, thrive in their careers, and learn from one another.

•    Have a good onboarding process in place and remain innovative. Seventy-seven percent of employees who have a formal onboarding process meet their performance goals. In today’s world, onboarding Millennials is different from the orientation process you implemented five years ago. For the Millennial generation, the onboarding experience should begin before the first day and continue past the one-year anniversary mark. Millennials are asking for ongoing peer mentoring from organizations. This generation is always digitally connected, and it is critical you meet them where they are and connect with them at all times. You have to facilitate knowledge to employees electronically through an online solution that gives them access to your company’s resources and events. One of the biggest HR challenges is that employers spend capital on bringing employees in but forget to continue the process afterward. It’s important that your workplace continues to thrive and remain innovative as technology evolves.

Millennials are the future of the workplace, and it’s important for businesses today to understand what this generation wants and needs. Learn more about Millennials by downloading our recent research report on the generation.

How payroll can you help you find superstar performers in the workplace

21 Jul

Benoit Gruber, VP, global product marketing at Sage, shares with us how payroll can help you find and keep your star performers.

FindingSuperstarEmployeesFinding your star performers

Modern HR and payroll technology can help you manage colleague performance and development. With workforce analytics, you can now find your star performers and keep hold of them.

Depending on your industry, the cost of your workforce is likely to be between 30-50% of your total overheads.

Through payroll data you can collect information about salary, absence, overtime, training costs, and return on investment. Cross-reference this data with qualitative information you have about colleagues—how they are viewed in terms of your performance culture by their peers, superiors, and teams—to develop a complete understanding of who your high achievers are.

Create a breeding ground for talent
Trend analysis allows HR to understand the working conditions that allow new stand-out talent to bloom.

For example, if a certain department has a low turnover rate and consistently good appraisals, then using data to find out why will help you recreate the department’s environment across the entire business.

Technology can also provide tools that help you decide which colleagues could benefit from training—it provides valuable insight to inform decisions that a paper-based system could not do.

Turn your star performers into mentors who can help other colleagues who find the business more challenging and need inspiration.

Often the star performers expect support for self-directed training—HR is in an ideal position to help create innovative programs and bring in new training platforms.

Keeping your star performers happy

Top-performing colleagues seek higher pay and greater opportunities. According to a U.S. survey by Gallup, 32% of people cited a lack of promotional opportunities as a reason for changing jobs, ahead of 22% who claimed pay and benefits caused them to seek a new position.* It’s important to identify the stand-out colleagues who are helping to drive the company forward, and do what you can to retain them.

Start by looking at payroll and performance data to make sure that your star performers are getting the remuneration they deserve for driving your business forward. This could mean better pay or bonuses or simply positive feedback showing that you appreciate the extra hours they are putting in.

It’s also worth bearing in mind what your competitors offer in terms of salary, working hours, vacation time, and benefits—you need to be at the very least matching and ideally exceeding them.

You should also have a way of identifying what your star performers value most. There is no point in investing in costly initiatives or training programs if your colleagues aren’t going to benefit from them. Give them the opportunity to shape their own careers and determine how they are rewarded.

Left alone, star performers will see opportunities with competitors. Your payroll data gives you the chance to build a complete view of the talent in your business—what creates, motivates, and retains the star performers, wherever they are in your organization. It’s important to take notice of what payroll data tells you, because once a star performer has handed in his or her notice, it’s already too late.

Find out how Return on Employee Investment can help you find rockstar employees by tuning into our latest webcast.

Benoit Gruber

VP, global product marketing at Sage

* Gallup, Inc. January 2015

Get a better handle on your conflict and relationship management

9 Feb

Failure Leading to GriefWhy does it seem that some people deal with conflict more easily than others? Does it seem to you that there are some people that appear to thrive in high-stress situations? For some folks, it’s very hard to assess and manage conflict, while for others, it seems to come naturally. Learning how to identify sources of conflict and managing expectations requires a lot of patience and is hard work. If you can learn how to identify sources of conflict, recognize the early warning signs of destructive conflict, identify how to deconstruct your thought process, it can help you toward developing positive outcomes during stressful situations. Here are just a few tips on how to get a better handle on managing your conflicts and relationship management more constructively.

Managing conflict may mean you need to learn to manage your expectation of others better. If you repeatedly have the same outcome from an individual you are in conflict with, it may be time to tweak your thought process a little in a way that will help resolve situations and keep your feelings in check. I’m not suggesting that you conform to the person you are in conflict with but, stop thinking you can change people. You can’t. However, you can change certain behaviors. Start changing your behavior first, then you will be able to find other ways that may be leading indicators of others’ behaviors. This may help you to realize ways in which you can help to manage to a more favorable outcome.

Observe others who you feel are successful at handling stressful situations, those who seem to have those positive outcomes you desire. What behaviors do they exhibit that you can emulate? Don’t reinvent the wheel; take something that you see worked for someone else, then adapt it a little and try to make that type of behavior work even better for you.

It also helps to learn what your “hot buttons” are. If you know what negatively escalates your mood, you are already one step ahead of the game and can manage your internal response to others’ behaviors. This will help you facilitate discussions that are open, constructive and less emotional. Sometimes when you take the emotional factors out of the equation, this allows you to process your thoughts in a logical manner and helps to yield a more positive outcome.

Start employing a certain level of empathy toward others, even if or when they’ve pushed your hot buttons. Again, it’ll help you think in a more logical sequence thus, providing you with a clear pathway to resolving your conflict. This takes a lot of practice but, it does work. Try it. You’ll see.

Now, ask yourself how important it is to be right in all situations. Sometimes making simple concessions help diffuse situations quickly and move you a huge step forward in working constructively to resolve conflict. If you are the type that likes to be right all the time, set a personal goal for yourself to be right less of the time. That means something different for everyone however, it’s part of modifying your behavior in a way that others may take notice. Their perceptions of you may change to a certain degree and situations could end up more favorably than you thought they would.

Do you have a positive attitude? Sure you do. Everyone thinks they do. Here’s where you need to take a true self-assessment on it. Make the assumption that you could do some work and retooling on your positive attitude and thought process. Yes, thinking positively will help. While others dwell on negativity, continue with a positive outlook. Continue this positive outlook even in the face of your worst adversity. No one who is truly working toward conflict resolution and relationship management appreciates a negative attitude.

So, in the grand scheme of things, how important is the issue you are working through? Sometimes situations that occur are part of a much bigger process or outcome. Try talking your situation through with the other person and actually trying to see things from his or her perspective. This is one of the hardest things to do but, once you hone that skill, you begin to see things that others don’t. This may prove instrumental to you in problem solving and conflict resolution.

What’s your tolerance level and actual acceptance of others? Not everyone will act or think like you do. People come from diverse backgrounds and will have other perspectives to offer that may differ from your opinions. Take the time to actually appreciate this diversity and let their perspective “marinate” in your thoughts before you act or over-react. Doing this will keep your emotions in check and allow for processing thoughts using a variety of ways, all working toward a more favorable outcome.

Of course you already know to maintain professionalism. But keep a calm tone in your voice. Don’t escalate it if someone else begins to escalate theirs. As a matter of fact, when someone begins to raise his or her voice, bring yours down an octave. Also remember, no one appreciates sarcasm, so keep that out of the equation all together.

Last but not least, I’ve found that simply openly and honestly communicating with the person (in a non-threatening manner) always works the best. Try approaching the person you are having a conflict with in a very sincere manner, talk through your points, take the time to listen to his or her points, then offer a compromise somewhere in the middle. Of course, there will be times where it may come down to saying to that other person “Let’s just agree to disagree,” but at least you’ve agreed to something.

 

 

Are you subtly but certainly killing your credibility?

29 Jan

Recruiting and retaining millennials can be difficult for many companies.Want to know how to build and sustain credibility as an HR professional? Practice your communication so that it delivers the desired results that will allow you to be viewed as a credible resource. Does credibility of your function really even matter? It most certainly does. As a matter of fact, it matters for every function within an organization, regardless of the role you have within it. Here are just a couple of tips for you to establish, maintain, and become the trusted resource for providing credible information.

When someone asks for your assistance, listen to their request. Ascertain if it’s reasonable, and if the request isn’t “up your alley,” then redirect the person making the request accordingly to the accurate person or area. Don’t waste his or her time by providing vague answers or answers that you think are correct. However, if you choose to redirect the request, take that extra step to ensure the requestor has been given a response by doing a quick follow-up with the requestor. Keep in mind that any lack of further response from where the requestor was re-directed may provide the requestor with a negative perception of you. Do this a few times and your credibility perception will quickly, but subtly spread. Take the time to follow up. Appropriate follow-up builds credibility.

Don’t make promises you can’t deliver on. This sounds like a no-brainer but really, think before you speak. Don’t say anything affirmatively to anyone without having all of your facts straight then think you can simply retract it later on because you didn’t do the appropriate fact-finding. Don’t kid yourself. This erodes credibility in a big way as well.

If someone knows more about a certain topic than you do, don’t try to “one up” him with your knowledge. People are looking for you to deliver specialized expertise and advice to your organization for the information that you are most familiar with. If there’s even a hint or illusion that you don’t know what you are talking about, people will stop seeking guidance from you within your specialized area of knowledge or expertise. In some cases, they may even find a way to work around you. Allow others who are viewed as the experts in their field to apply their expertise. This is one of the hardest habits to break.

So what do you do about it? Well, we’ve all heard about 360-degree reviews, right? You’ll need to do this assessment on yourself. Start right away. Don’t ask your friend or your best colleague. They may not give you the honest, open feedback you need in an attempt to spare your feelings. Don’t ask your direct reports either. After all, you sign off on their reviews and hold a key to their future. Do you really think they will tell you what you don’t want to hear when it comes to this? You have a couple of choices here. You can seek the input of someone who others view as credible, not who you view as being credible and ask them for an honest assessment of what their honest perception is of your credibility and hope they give you the honest feedback. It’s advisable to tell them first that in order to become a better leader, there are always ways where one can improve upon themselves. So, since this is one area that you want to improve upon for yourself, you are soliciting their feedback and honest input.  Or, you can just reflect upon yourself, admit you do these things and begin to change your behavior now.

 

 

 

 

 

Happy New Year 2015 and beyond for HR

12 Jan

Formal Audit PeopleRobin Rothman, Product Marketing Manager answers an inquiry from Steve Browne’s call to HR Professionals asking for posts around the theme “I’d make HR better by…”. Steve also wanted to know how we could improve HR in 2015 and beyond.

One of the scariest things HR professionals face in their career is when any outside entity challenges the employment practices they’ve either enacted at their company or have inherited as being the new HR people there. Either way, not a good time. This challenge takes on many forms, but let’s just stick with the scariest of them all—compliance issues.

No one likes an audit, and of course . . . NO ONE likes to receive formal notice he will be undergoing an audit, let alone to receive notice of a lawsuit because of some “triggering event” that occurred which prompted one. This is scary stuff for everyone involved! Believe me, I’ve been there, and I’m sure a lot of you have been there too. Again, not a good time.

HR compliance is becoming more of a formal process that affects the management and use of HR resources and assists the business in identifying information about current and potential risks. HR is also becoming more of a strategic partner to the business in identifying risks and/or threats to the organization. They are often being called upon to assist the business with its SWOT analysis.

A SWOT analysis (or sometimes referred to as the SWOT matrix) is a structured planning method used to evaluate the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats involved in a business. You’ll need to become more familiar with this term. The role of HR is evolving to become more strategic in nature. This is due to the evolving field of the HR/payroll profession. As external threats to the business continue to increase and more audits are being facilitated, HR is being called upon more to assist the business with their expertise to directly deal with these processes.

For HR 2015 and beyond, I would like to see all HR professionals learn to be more strategic by utilizing their HR systems to the fullest extent to facilitate audits appropriately and by carefully inserting themselves into those areas of the business where they will gain the most leverage. This will enable their function to be more proactive. The HR professionals should drive the SWOT analysis using their expertise. Net effect, overall business processes will meet all compliance mandates, litigation will decrease, auditors and employees will be happy, and the HR department will be viewed as a critical, proactive, strategic resource.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Help! I need people, now!

5 Jan

Negative WorkplaceWhen you start out as a relatively small company, do you really have a dedicated resource for recruiting top talent for your organization? My guess is … probably not. A portion of your day is spent doing a plethora of other tasks. After your hectic day doing those other HR/benefit/payroll- related tasks, you probably find that a majority of your time is also spent speaking with candidates at night when it’s convenient for them (even when it may not always be convenient for you). You do the obligatory phone screens, take your detailed notes: then what? What do you do with them? If you are working for a small company, you might be using spreadsheets to keep track of everything. If you are lucky enough to know about database structure and have a resource at your company to assist you, maybe you’ve even gone the route of creating a database using a slick database program. But, every time you need to make a change to that database, you need to ask for external assistance. Now, you need to wait until it fits into their schedule to help you. Helpful, maybe so, but you eventually become frustrated; especially if you are used to being very self-sufficient at your HR, benefits, or payroll role. Sound familiar? Housing all of this information can be done in any number of ways, but what happens when you have the need to create reports after you’ve entered your data into those spreadsheets or other “applications”?

That’s a tough one for sure. How about if you have responsibility for providing data in support of Affirmative Action plans? Hmm, looks like your frustration level has just kicked it up a notch and your job got even tougher. How about if you need to create a report for an audit or external source that requests drilled-down data on your candidates? Harder … Tougher? Well, almost impossible; especially if you don’t have the skill or expertise in performing systemic data metric calculations or creating and formatting customized reports using your data. After all, you’re not really a system expert, so, what do you do now?

Stop spinning your wheels, that’s what you need to do! Invest your time into evaluating a really great applicant tracking system that can do all that work for you. Selecting the right tool to get this job done isn’t as hard as you think it is. Let me point you in the right direction … Sage HRMS Cyber Recruiter by Visibility Software should be the first place you look. Why?

Simply put, this software can automate and streamline your recruiting and hiring processes from start to finish. You’ll eventually find yourself spending less time on paperwork and more time finding fantastic candidates. Really! Take the first step and start here … Visit our website: www.sagehrms or call Sage at 866-271-6050 and learn more about how you can make this product work for you.

 

 

Does anyone really care about performance evaluations?

3 Dec

Perhaps it’s what occurs during the annual performance evaluation meeting with the employee? Let’s look at a typical scenario. The manager delivers the annual feedback; the employee is “surprised” because he or she hasn’t heard any of that feedback all year long and now the employee “challenges” their manager on the evaluation claiming his or her evaluation isn’t “fair.” Aha, there’s the dreaded confrontation associated with the review. Here it is. Face-to-face confrontation. Why would the manager fear this confrontation? Perhaps, it’s the fact that manager is suddenly put into a defensive position? Could it be that the manager failed to provide regular feedback to the employee throughout the year and has no choice but to deal with it now? Is that fair? How would that manager feel if this was done to her? Maybe this has happened to the manager before, and now the manager believes it’s perfectly acceptable to do the same thing to her direct reports? Maybe it’s a new manager who believes he knows what he is doing, but really doesn’t have a clue? Did ego come into play at all? There could be a lot of reasons.In any case, employees need guidance. They need regular feedback.

Whether that feedback is positive or negative, employees need and want to hear it. The manager needs to “manage” and learn to deal with it. How do managers expect to receive positive behavior from their employees without any reinforcement from the manager on the feedback of their behavior? How does an employee know what is expected of him or whether or not he needs to improve upon a certain behavior if he has not been given any direction throughout the year? You can clearly see how these disconnects occur.

Aside from the myriad of legal issues that often arise from continued performance feedback “avoidance,” its helpful (and necessary) for managers to educate themselves on how to deliver feedback. A lot of this is common sense. So, why do many managers feel it’s the responsibility of human resources to educate them on why employee performance feedback is so important? Why do managers tell human resource professionals, “I haven’t received any training on it so I didn’t know I should be doing it”? Why do managers feel they do not have accountability for this aspect of their management function? Like any other skill, performance feedback training needs to be cultivated. Since each and every person and situation is different, it’s impossible for the human resource professional to facilitate definitive training needed to cover every situation.

It’s up to human resources to guide and counsel their management teams. What that means is that human resources should be relied upon to guide and counsel management on decisions that affect their people and the overall business. Unless it is a first-time manager, human resources can help to provide the education needed to get the manager up to speed and on the right path. There must be accountability on management’s part to take ownership of their direct reports by providing regular feedback to them, then seek human resource guidance and counsel on issues where the desired outcome of an employee’s performance has not or cannot be achieved through the development plans that the manager has set forth for the employee to follow to get that performance back on track.

Visit www.sagehrms.com to see all of the available solutions to help you manage the total employment lifecycle process.

What makes a good employee handbook?

1 Dec

Employee Training is Affordable Way to Improve ROEIIf written correctly, the employee handbook can be a terrific resource for the employer and the employee. There are several elements that should be included within that relate to the company’s history/mission, values, policies, procedures, and benefits. Make no mistake about it, the handbook is often viewed as a means of protecting the company against discrimination and unfair employment practice claims but will also provide an outline of the general expectation that the employer has for its employees. Don’t confuse the employee handbook with a policy and procedure book. The two are different. A policy is a written statement that reflects the employer’s standards and objectives relating to the various employee activities and employment related issues. You can see clearly there is a difference. It is advisable for you to include legal counsel input as you craft an employee handbook. The handbook should be generic enough for the employees to know what is expected of them but provide enough guidance leading them to where they can go for the actual written policies of the company (which may exist in other department specific documents and/or standard operating procedure guides). Including legal counsel will ensure your policies conform to updated federal and state guidelines.

Employers should ensure the handbook is distributed to every employee within the organization (regardless of specific levels or job titles) and secure a written acknowledgement of their employees who have received the handbook, thus ensuring that all employees have read and understood the contents. Once the employer receives the acknowledgment, it should be secured in each employee’s personnel file. This is a very important step. A checklist should be developed to ensure that every employee’s acknowledgment (complete with signature) has been received. Written returned employee handbook acknowledgments should be readily available for you but completely secured with limited access. Keep in mind that state laws vary on electronic record retention schedules. Again, partnering in with your legal counsel will ensure your company remains compliant.

Handbooks should never be construed as an employment agreement; which could affect the employer’s “at-will status” with the employee. Handbooks should always be reviewed by legal counsel before distribution to the employees. Consult professional legal guidance for clarity in defining the differences between state and federal laws.

What if an employee handbook already exists at a company?

If your job now includes responsibility for employee handbooks, all the employer’s policies and procedures should be reviewed again to ensure they contain all of the provisions that the employer wants contained within as well as ensuring all applicable state and/or federal provisions have been included.  No assumptions should be made. Begin the process from scratch and cross-reference with the handbook that already exists. If the policies in the current handbook don’t make sense to you, they more than likely won’t make sense to an employee once reissued (or may be misunderstood by current employees). Rewrite the policy and provide your draft to legal counsel for review. If a policy doesn’t exist, write one. Partner with the appropriate department leads to which any policy affects. Have them review it first and then partner with your legal counsel. Prepare as much of the draft as you can as this will save a lot of cost. Here’s an example. If it’s a policy that supports the payment of paid time off and the payroll eepartment within the organization will be the department that supports and ultimately administers the policy on a daily basis, have that department head review it to ensure it clearly conveys the intent of the policy and that it can actually be administered by that department in the manner in which it is written and intended to be administered. Again, the emphasis will be to ensure that your legal counsel has had the opportunity to review this prior to any policy issuance to the employees. This will also help ensure compliance.

What else should be in there?

Most employee handbooks include a message such as from the company owner, CEO, president, or other higher entity within the organization. It’s usually a welcome message that contains something about the company’s mission, purpose, or intent. It’s a great way to establish positive associate relations.

Of course, other important statements should be included such as, EEO, employment at-will, FMLA, COBRA, EEOC, anti-discrimination laws, ADA, and FLSA. Many other important considerations and legal mandates could apply in certain states. Again, it would be advantageous for you to have legal counsel review prior to issuance to the employees. Use all of the sources available to you; inclusive of any professional human resource organizations. If you’re not a member of any professional organization, join one that that is reputable and that you are comfortable with. Ask other professionals within your field. They will be able to help you select an organization that you can contact for introductory information. Professional human resource organizations will be able to assist you with tasks that are common to professionals within your industry. They may also be able to provide samples, templates, toolkits or checklists of items that you may have forgotten or for topics and/or items you weren’t even aware of because you are new to the field or performing this task.

Considerations for distribution to employees

Posting to your company intranet is a great way to communicate the handbook, however you need to be sure that there has been a mechanism created that can legally obtain the employee’s signed written acknowledgement. You’ll also need to consider how you will distribute the handbook to new employees.  Create a checklist to cross-reference the written acknowledgments you receive. You should receive an acknowledgement from every person of your organization, regardless of level or position within the company. Employee acknowledgements should be housed in a secure location, with access kept to a minimum.

Updating the handbook in between cycles

So, you’ve just finished updating your employee handbook and distributed it to the employees and you have now been made aware of a new major policy. Simple: create an addendum. Once you have had legal counsel review it, post the update to your intranet, recirculate the policy to the employees and be sure to include the addendum in your next major handbook update. Check with your legal counsel to inquire if you need to obtain any written acknowledgments from the employees. Be sure to clearly reference any previous policy that has been updated. Clearly convey that the new policy replaces any other versions that may have been previously circulated. Make sure the addendum contains a date or current revision schematic (if you use one). It should be extremely clear which policy governs and be easily cross-referenced with the new policy. Sometimes it’s helpful to provide a small paragraph that outlines exact changes to the policies. These help outline the differences between the policies.

Summary

Partner in with department heads who are responsible for administering a particular policy. Ensure you take their feedback into consideration and have them approve any and all final drafts of policies.

Review all drafts for clarity, consistency, and typos.

Use current revision schematics or calendar dates where necessary.

Ensure that a draft of the final employee handbook is provided to the executive that you directly report to so he or she has the opportunity to ask questions or provide feedback.

Obtain legal review; this is extremely important.

Obtain signed written employee handbook acknowledgements from every person and level within the organization.

File all signed written acknowledgements in a secure location; limiting access to only those who will absolutely need it.

Consult professional human Resource organizations for guidance in preparation or for best practices.

Visit www.sagehrms.com for solutions that can help you manage the total employment life cycle.

 

 

Why employee self-service matters

18 Nov

HR Trend AnalysisWhat is employee self-service? You hear that term a lot, but if you are a relatively small employer and/or new to the HR role, do you really know? I didn’t until someone explained the concept and informed me that there was actually a product that could tie into my core HRMS to do the things I had been doing manually for years, then disseminate the necessary information to my managers and executives for approval or notification. Wow, talk about a surprise! How many personnel action forms have you completed for address changes, emergency contacts, phone number changes, and so on? You know the drill. A PA form is needed for everything! Plus, as HR, we are taught to “document” everything for use at some later point in time. Imagine … Employees key in their changes to personal information from the comfort of their desks (or even their homes), then, these changes follow some type of logical expression or pathway that you’ve preset in the system to automatically route to the appropriate individual(s) for approval or notification. Employees are able to access other pieces of HR information, which includes skills, job history, and performance reviews. Managers have instant access to employee data for both direct and indirect reports. They can review attendance information, employee performance, salary history, time off requested and much more. Really, the possibilities are endless.  Again … .whoaaaaa, cool! For some companies I’ve worked for, I was the person actually introducing and/or creating the PA form. What I mean by creating the PA form is taking a form and actually crafting it into an MS Word or other application (that is similar to being an artist or graphic designer using the computer), then training everyone on the PA form use, or just offering to complete the PA form for the managers to save them time for whatever change it is they needed to make within the HRMS. Can you say time consuming? Have you ever held that role? If you work in a small company, sure you have!

So, what’s the lesson learned or key takeaway here? Employee self-service products really can and do save you time and money. More importantly, though, they yield a healthy Return on Employee Investment by creating the best circumstances for each individual in the organization to perform at his or her best potential. For some employees within the organization empowerment makes all the difference in the world. By giving your employees ownership of their personal information and enabling them to input their own changes directly into the HRMS when it’s convenient for them to do so, you promote workplace satisfaction, thereby increasing your Return on Employee Investment. In addition, by encouraging your employees to use employee self-service to gain access to the relevant information they need when they need it, you can begin to enhance company communication and improve motivation. Plus, increasing employee engagement correlates directly with a positive impact on key metrics within the business, which will ultimately help the organization reach its goals.

The first step you need to take, though, is actually seeing an employee self-service product in action and then talking to a few people who are similarly situated to you with respect to the size of your organization and your specific role within it. It’s really that simple. I admit I was reluctant to the process at first because I thought I’d been doing a pretty good job of things on my own; however, once I realized (and saw for myself) that I could streamline this process entirely, while empowering my employees in the process, then I could begin to retool the next big labor intensive HR process.

Take the first step and start here … Visit our website: http://www.sagehrms.com/ or call Sage at 866-271-6050 and learn more about how this product will help you.

 

Have you lost your work-life balance or is it already gone?

3 Nov

HR Work Life BalanceAs an HR/Payroll professional, how many times in your career have you heard someone say, “I need to get a life outside of this place?” or “All I do is work, work, work,” or “my kids don’t even know who I am anymore” or “I need a mental health day.” Sound familiar? Sure it does. Maybe you have even joked about it with your friends or said it to yourself. In any case, it looks like your life has gotten a little off balance.

That’s okay. It happens a lot in HR/payroll. Why? Let’s face it. Depending upon your role in the profession, this can literally be a 24/7 proposition. How are you going to say to someone who needs your help with their HR or payroll issue (an issue that really can’t wait like a paycheck that didn’t make it into a direct deposit account, someone’s health deduction was taken out twice on their check, an employee who had the wrong state’s taxes taken from their check, a hospitalized child where the parent is having a problem with his or her medical insurance not being accepted at the hospital, a “tomorrow surgery” with a rejected referral today, or an employee who has just told you that she has been harassed by a coworker)–so do you say to those employees, “yeah . . . hey, I’ll get to that tomorrow morning, promise.”

Okay, we all know that doesn’t fly and for those of you who know you can’t actually do it tomorrow (and are one of those who will think about these issues on your own time), and that means most of us in this profession, this is where too many of these situations can lead to your work- life balance getting thrown off, and burnout is most likely to occur. Aside from seeking the traditional forms of assistance for yourself, you need to start fixing this by trying to simplify your work as much as you can. If the type of person you are doesn’t allow you to “turn off” the 24/7 needs of others, then you need to simplify those parts of your job that have not been allowing you to focus more on the human aspect of the job that you enjoy the most. So, where do you begin?

First, assess how much paper you currently use in your process. Aside from enjoying the freedom of being able to “go green,” is there a process or two that you can bring online? Can you relinquish some of the control and allow the managers and employees in your company to take ownership for some input and entry of process? You can do it! Did you know that there are tools available that are classified as “employee self-service” tools that enable you to streamline some of the more repetitive tasks in your role? For example, instead of calling the HR department with routine inquiries, your employees and managers can be more self-sufficient when they can access information, such as time off, current benefits, and current job details—anytime, anyplace over the Internet or company intranet. These tools can even empower you to dynamically and securely provide on-demand workforce data to executives, managers, and others; all of this can even be done without IT support.

Help yourself the way that you help your employees, managers, and others day in and day out. Check out www.sagehrms.com or call 866-271-6050. Allow Sage to show you really how much can be taken off your plate so you can get the much needed balance back into your life.