The positive influence of rounding on employee morale

27 Apr

Rounding is a powerful tool that HR professionals can use to better understand employee needs.

Human resources professionals can improve employee management and engagement by using a tactic called rounding.

What is rounding?
Rounding is defined by Capstone Leadership Solutions as the act of meeting with employees, either in small groups or one-on-one, to discuss thoughts, concerns and praise about current business practices. It is proactive leadership aimed at improving employee-employer relationships. Often used in health care facilities to ensure patient safety, rounding is an excellent tool management and HR can use to improve performance and build trust among workers.

Why is rounding important?
Rounding is important because it establishes loyalty among employees and their team members, supervisors and corporations as a whole. It's also a good way to boost morale. Workers want to know they are valued and contribute meaningful work to an organization. When a senior member of the company engages employees in honest conversation, that effort demonstrates a genuine interest in the work being done.

In addition, personal conversations increase leader visibility and thus, transparency. No one likes being left in the dark when it comes to changes or updates at a company. Leadership engaging with entry- and mid-level employees boosts trust throughout a business.

This type of interaction also improves employee value proposition, which is the views current and prospective employees hold of a particular employer. If workers feel mistreated, deprived of fulfilling work or like there is no room for growth at an organization, they'll be disgruntled and pass that information on to others. However, if HR engages in rounding, it can more easily spot these trouble areas and work with employees to fix them.

Without rounding, key issues with client relationships or talent development may go unnoticed. Employees could feel uncomfortable bringing up specific client issues with supervisors in front of others; instead, a private meeting may be the best setting to openly discuss problems and then work toward positive solutions. 

How to perform rounding in the workplace
Southern Ohio Medical Center stated there are strategies businesses can implement to get the most out of rounding efforts. The following are several tips for HR professionals looking to either establish a rounding practice or enhance the one currently in place:

  • Schedule: It's important to set a time and place for rounding meetings, as this solidifies investment in the process. Make sure this time works for all parties involved. The Medical University of South Carolina recommended allotting 10- 15 minutes for a rounding session, though depending on the employee or topics at hand, rounding could extend well beyond this timeframe. 
  • Follow through: Be on time to a scheduled rounding meeting. This shows respect and instills confidence in employees that their opinions matter to leaders. 
  • Ask open-ended questions: Initiate the conversation with a question designed to bring about deeper conversation. Yes or no questions defeat the purpose of successful rounding. 
  • Don't ignore equipment: While pertinent to the medical industry for sure, its worth inquiring if employees in any industry have all the tools they need to effectively do their jobs. 
  • Follow up: Check back in with team members after rounding. Follow up on key discussion points or plans of action. 

Rounding is a powerful tool HR departments can use to better engage and connect with employees. 

Comments are closed.