Managing employee and employer relations

23 Feb

Keeping workers happy is a major part of managing employee relations.

Employee relations is a major part of human resources. If workers don't get along with their managers and each other, then tasks can't be completed effectively. Creating a good workplace means beginning with helping the people who work together feel safe and welcome to come to the office every day. Perhaps more importantly, the HR staff should listen to everything happening at a business and provide the tools managers need to help keep their staff feeling healthy, secure and able to do a great job every day.

Maintain a high-quality workplace
Keeping the workplace happy, comfortable and safe is a critical piece of employee relations, according to the Houston Chronicle. Depending on the company, different human resources teams might have unique abilities to impact how people feel about their jobs. This could mean listening to employees and reporting on this info to those in charge of making appropriate changes. For example, if workers have to deal with a noisy machine, then HR might be able to communicate with the relevant department about noise levels and tips on how to control sound in the office.

Listening to the complaints of workers is also a major issue. This has to do both with keeping the workplace safe as well as acting as a disinterested third-party during conflict resolution. For workers who act inappropriately, the applicable disciplinary actions must be enforced. This can be anything from termination to correcting poor performance after a quarterly review. HR Managers must be sure to follow all appropriate rules and regulations and see to it that employees do the same.

Expanding the employee relations role to include other stakeholders
Employee relations may also involve the relationships that a company has with unions and governmental agencies, according to Wiley, an Australian educational website. Major issues that remain outstanding and continue to be relevant in HR are the matter of minimum wages and workers' rights – including the rights of interns. Proper human resources management requires negotiating with unions about the proper compensation appropriate to certain roles. For example, if a company plans to incorporate an extra line of products that will require additional work or hiring more people, then it must communicate this information to any applicable unions to make sure the company remains in good standing. Doing so will help companies remain on good terms with every stakeholder both inside and outside the office.

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