The NFL and domestic violence

20 Oct

The NFL is facing a crisis because of its domestic violence policy.

Recent domestic violence disputes in the NFL have caused many in the human resources field to look toward their own businesses and ask what they themselves are doing about this issue.  According to Human Resources Executive Online, less than a third of of U.S. workplaces have a domestic violence policy. Even those with a policy often focus on protecting the victim and avoid punishment for the perpetrator.

For the NFL, the question is pressing because the company is such a public one. Many are calling for someone to audit the NFL to make sure it is taking domestic violence situations seriously. However, who would audit the NFL? Would it be a major company like a Big Four accounting firm, or would another party have to step forward?

So far, the employee management department at the NFL has appointed four women to review its policies on domestic violence and sexual assault. Critics, according to HRE Online, have raised concerns about what they perceive to be the tepid response by the NFL, which originally punished offenders with a two-game suspension. Additionally, according to Forbes, many times the punishments faced by offenders are suspended long enough for them to play in important games. Players can appeal to have their suspensions removed, because of due process, this can often work. Forbes also cited that the players' union often supports these actions.

Creating a domestic violence policy
Whether or not the NFL finds a more appropriate solution to the problem of domestic violence with its players, ordinary companies must also find a way to create solutions that help the victims and punish the perpetrators of domestic violence. HRE Online cited the statistic that 321 women and 38 men were killed on the job by a current or former spouse between 1997 and 2009. Additionally, of the women killed in the workplace, 33 percent were murdered by their former or current partner.

With only 30 percent of employers taking responsibility for domestic violence, many people who have spent time trying to escape their spouses because of injuries, finding a safe house or getting a court-ordered restraining order against their former partner have lost their jobs because of missed days at work or other reasons, according to Forbes.

The challenges of policy-making
One of the difficulties of punishing those who commit domestic violence by firing them is that it may ultimately serve to perpetuate domestic violence, according to U.K. news site My Next Fone. If someone loses his or her job from committing a violent act, then that person may attack his or her partner in anger. Or, a partner may be afraid to come forward because he or she relies on his or her spouse for monetary support.

Those who want to find an existing model for domestic violence solutions may wish to look to the federal government.  The U.S. Office of Personnel Management has published a document called  "Guidance for Agency-Specific Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, and Stalking Policy" which federal agencies use to resolve disputes relating to those issues. One concern with the plan is that it focuses on an employee's ability to perform his or her job – the government does not want to address what it perceives as a personal problem.

Because of the public nature of the NFL, many will be turning to it to see how it resolves these issues as they become more exposed to the media. If the NFL takes its own problem with domestic violence seriously, then likely other companies will follow suit. The conversations happening at many HR departments right now are primarily due, after all, to the recent domestic violence suspensions that have taken place very publicly.

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