The needed skills of the future will be technological

27 Oct

Jobs of the future will heavily involve computers.

The major skills people will need in the future – whether for a job in human resources management or not – will likely pertain to computers. According to the Daily News Journal, anyone with the ability to code and engineer computer programs will be in a good place to find work. What this means for HR professionals is that most hires will likely have some computer experience on their resumes. Those in a position to hire someone will need to know what the certifications are and if they are relevant to a particular job. It may also come to pass that managers directly responsible for programming computers or running databases will choose their employees themselves. Additionally, employee management software will likely grow in importance as technology becomes a major part of the workplace.

Other jobs that are growing involve the so-called STEM core, which stands for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. These jobs will be highly paid and are currently expanding – 38 percent of the "high skill" jobs that will exist in the future are predicted to be STEM jobs, the Daily News Journal reported.

Technology will drive changes in the workplace
Most people have computer skills that prior generations wouldn't have needed because of the large volume of work done on machines today. For example, a generation ago, Microsoft Excel didn't exist, and so nobody needed to know how to code macros or do any of the things that even non-programming or engineering jobs now require. Most people in human resources know how to work with complex programs and to design spreadsheets that will automatically populate after someone enters the relevant information into a formula. The basic pool of required computer knowledge will likely grow further, although computers will probably become even more user-friendly. Time Magazine predicted that jobs at superstructured organizations will grow. Large-scale organizations – i.e. companies with many different departments and divisions around the world – will use complex social tools, such as automated scheduling systems and human resources portals, to boost the economies of scale for a company. This allows a business to grow without losing its ability to regulate and keep order among its employees.

There will also be a need for people who can work with what Time calls the "new media," which is the growing number of social media platforms people use to gather information. Employees will also need the ability to work in different cultures and surrounded with multiple languages because of the necessity for a growing workforce that will increasingly telecommute to work.

As the world becomes more wired, the skills that are already important for HR managers will become more necessary. The the newer talents that will soon be a requirement for a proper human resources development will grow directly from advances in technology that bring people together.

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