Planning for emergencies

27 Oct

Emergencies require preparation in advance is a company is going to recover quickly.

The Ebola virus has everyone worried about issues with emergencies. Although the chance of Ebola turning up in a business setting is slim to none, it may still be a good time to consider whether the office has an emergency plan set in case of dangerous situations, such as a fire or an earthquake. Making sure the HR department has a human resources solution for any emergencies and keeps the office informed about what to do can help to mitigate the risks of potentially dangerous situations.

One major concern in the case of a fire is the damage caused to files and computers. If data is being stored on site, then the people in charge of it should have a backup plan in case the office needs to be evacuated. One way of doing this is by uploading crucial information to a cloud-based server that exists in another part of the city or state.

Disaster communication
According to the Society for Human Resource Management, communication during an emergency is one of the major factors that can get overlooked. A plan that combines departments and certain sections of the office into particular groups, which all have leaders who can guide people away from danger and toward emergency exits is one plan that might help to keep people on the same page in the event of an emergency. Walkie-talkies are a bonus that would allow for other strategies, such as keeping people near exits to make sure everyone leaves the office and no one is left behind.

Carol Chastang, who recently spoke for the U.S. Small Business Administration's Office of Disaster Assistance, warns against misinformation, which can be just as damaging as having no information  about a disaster. This is particularly true after the incident is over and the company is on its way to recovery.

"When a disaster occurs, it's often the misleading bit of information shared by an outsider that gins up rumors about a damaged business shutting down," said Carol Chastang, a spokesperson for the U.S. Small Business Administration's Office of Disaster Assistance. "Obviously, this situation undermines the company's ability to recover. That's one big reason why precise, effective communication—within the organization, and out to the public—is vital during an emergency."

The possibility of a U.S. epidemic
Although because Ebola doesn't become contagious until a victim is already symptomatic, it is unlikely there will be an Ebola outbreak in the U.S., Human Resources Online still stresses that it wouldn't be completely out of the boat to consider whether a similar disease might cause damage to a company.

"Having a pandemic plan on the shelf is not good [enough]," said Robert Quigley, U.S. medical director and senior vice president of medical assistance for International SOS.

He advocates that people get ready for a potential outbreak in the same way they might prepare for a fire – monitor where employees are traveling and caution them against going to places like West Africa, where the Ebola virus is prevalent. Additionally, make sure the pandemic plan includes the possibility for all sorts of diseases, not the most often appearing ones in the newspapers.

Comments are closed.