Tapping into the Talented Millennial Generation

21 Jul

Recruiting and retaining millennials can be difficult for many companies.

Millennials, also called Generation Y, is the latest generation in the workplace, and many recruiters and HR professionals have been looking for ways to recruit the most talented from this generation and what works best to keep them at the organization. Many companies have tried different tactics to drive recruiting and engagement from this age group – from offering fun competitions to giving them flexible work hours, employers are taking a lot of approaches to ensure their human capital is strong. Before HR professionals start implementing new ideas and strategies to recruit, engage and retain workers of this generation, they need to first understand what has already worked.

Determining What Resonates with Millennials
To some, millennials act entitled and jump from job to job, but Brent Grinsteiner – a recruiter at Manpower who also happens to be part of this generation – thinks negative perceptions about these workers overshadow their true benefits. Grinsteiner wrote millennials have experiences that are unique from other generations, and they are often driven to succeed and welcome professional development. They do best when they are given clear but concise information and are able to communicate through digital channels, such as email. LinkedIn's Lydia Abbot noted in an article that millennials are also strong multitaskers and collaborators who desire career advancement and a work-life balance. Grinsteiner wrote HR professionals need to understand that to reach out to millennials – whether they are employed at the company or are currently involved in the recruitment process – is that they want communication with their managers and to feel a sense of accomplishment from their tasks.

Therefore, best practices for acquiring and keeping top millennial talent often revolve around taking advantage of these attributes and leveraging their existing experience and abilities. Here are just a few best practices:

  • Recruit where millennials are: Many millennial workers use social media and online job boards to look for jobs, but they also often try to network both online and through their mentors. 
  • Make professional development fun: Gamification is one way to train and educate millennials, but collaborative training sessions can encourage teamwork and also be ben‚Äčeficial. 
  • Offer them opportunities to challenge themselves: Most millennials want to advance in their careers and develop new skills, so assigning them projects that can help improve their abilities and experience can be a great way to encourage loyalty.

One company that has been innovative with millennial employee engagement is Marina Maher Communications (MMC), which ended up creating a competition among the members of its workforce. According to an article in Forbes, MMC asked all of its employees to compete but collaborate with one another to raise money for the nonprofit She's the First. What resulted was a more creative and social company culture. The millennials in the workforce used their existing abilities, passion and resources to start fundraising, despite having no previous experience doing so. They were able to succeed at their goals because the company found something their millennial workers were passionate about. The Forbes article noted the company took away from this experience that millennials are resourceful and innovative, and the company culture has changed for the better because of it.

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